The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Human Evolution (Cambridge Reference Book)

The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Human Evolution (Cambridge Reference Book)

by StephenJones (Foreword), RichardDawkins (Foreword), RobertD.Martin (Foreword), David R . Pilbeam (Foreword)

Synopsis

The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Human Evolution is a wide-ranging introduction to the human species that places modern humans in evolutionary perspective. Over seventy scholars world-wide have worked on the encyclopedia, covering a range of subjects from genetics, primatology and fossil origins to human biology and ecology, brain function and behaviour, demography and disease. Emphasis is placed throughout on the biological diversity of modern people and the increasing convergence of the fossil and genetic evidence for human evolution that has emerged. Due to the need to look at humankind in the context of our closest relatives, the encyclopedia also pays particular attention to the evolution and ecology of other living primates - lemurs, lorises, tarsiers, monkeys and apes. It deals with the evolution and ecology of human society, as reconstructed from archaeological remains, and from studies of tribal peoples and living primates today. It considers the biology of uniquely human abilities such as language and upright walking, and it reviews the biological future of humankind in the face of modern challenges.

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More Information

Format: Paperback
Pages: 524
Edition: New Ed
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Published: 30 Jun 1994

ISBN 10: 0521467861
ISBN 13: 9780521467865
Book Overview: A wide-ranging introduction to the human species that places modern humans in evolutionary perspective.

Media Reviews
'... truly useful to a wide range of readers within anthropology, including graduate and undergraduate students as well as professors ... There is no better source for finding brief, accurate, and current synopses of the issues, problems and methods of analysis within the domain of human evolutionary studies.' American Journal of Physical Anthropology
' ... one of the best reference books of all time.' The Good Book Guide
'What an encyclopedia this is! You can read it confident you are getting the authoritative, well-informed and up-to-date view of qualified experts.' Richard Dawkins
' ... a feast of information for anyone interested in the history of our species ... If (whether student or professional) you're interested in human evolution, you'll want to have this volume handy.' Ian Tattersall, Nature
This book is unquestionably the best reference work dedicated to human evolution yet published....The stunning computer-generated composite image of human and chimpanzee faces that graces the cover illustrates the unmistakable link between humans and other primates that is emphasized on the pages within....The book resembles and reads like a textbook as much as an encyclopedia....This work is a comprehensive catalog of present knowledge and thus an absolutely essential source for all libraries. Library Journal
...this Cambridge title offers a wide-ranging introduction to the field...both comprehensive and usable...This work is highly recommended for general and research libraries of all types...The authoritative source material is both readable and accurate within the framework of current data. Laurel Grozinger, American Reference Books Annual
...succeeds admirably....a fascinating and beautiful introduction to human evolution in its broadest context....a useful reference for anyone interested in the subject. John G. Fleagle, The Quarterly Review of Biology
In all, this is an essential purchase for any anthropology library. The Times Higher Education Supplement
If (whether student or professional) you're interested in human evolution, you'll want to have this volume handy. Ian Tattersall, Nature
...I can think of no more useful guide to the research topics of general human evolution. Individually and collectively the essays are readable and scholarly, and the stylistic presentation is highly professional. At the very least it should be on the required reading list for courses on human evolution, for teachers and students alike. Walter Carl Hartwig, Evolutionary Anthropology
...a fine book; a worthy addition to the excellent Cambridge Encyclopedia series. Great to have on the shelves. Colin Tudge, New Scientist
...covers human ecology through broad topical articles. Topically, this new encyclopedia seems stronger on most behavior issues and provides more extensive attention to the evolution and ecology of relevant living primates, such as lemurs and monkeys. In addition, it is more up to date on such controversies as 'Mitochondrial Eve.' The academic approach and article length of The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Human Evolution will appeal most to university and research libraries. Booklist
...succeeds in providing truly 'encyclopedic' coverage of the whole gamut of human evolutionary studies....The quality of the writing is, for the most part, excellent, and the editors and contributing authors are to be commended for creating a volume that will be truly useful to a wide range of readers within anthropology, including graduate and undergraduate students as well as professors....I heartily recommend this volume to all anthropologists and university librarians. There is no better single source that I am aware of for finding brief, accurate, and current synopses of the issues, problems, and methods of analysis within the domain of human evolutionary studies. Robert L. Anemone, American Journal of Physical Anthropology
...a valuable reference book for anyone working in the field of human evolution. Keren R. Rosenberg, American Journal of Human Biology