Superconductivity: Next Revolution: The Next Revolution?

Superconductivity: Next Revolution: The Next Revolution?

Paperback
ISBN13: 9780521377577
Condition: USED Quantity
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1 item(s) in stock
£22.99
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In 1987 scientists and engineers were seized with excitement at the discovery of 'high temperature superconductors': these new materials become superconducting at temperatures four times higher than any previously known superconductor. Suddenly all kinds of applications of superconductivity, from magnetically levitated trains to lossless power lines, became possible. As a result of the intense media coverage of these discoveries, superconductivity has become almost a household word, although most people have only a vague idea of what it is. In this book Professor Vidali describes in plain, non-technical terms how conventional superconductivity was discovered 80 years ago, why it took nearly 50 years to understand it, and the physical explanation of why it exists. He chronicles the developments that led up to the discovery of high temperature superconducting materials, and describes the excitement generated by announcements of the new discoveries in 1987 at a scientific conference that became known as the 'Woodstock of physics'. Finally, he speculates on possible future applications of these new materials.

Type Book
Number Of Pages 180
Item Height 14 mm
Item Width 152 mm
Item Weight 298 Gram
Product Dimensions 152 x 14 x 224
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Format Paperback | 180

'The volume is aimed at fascinating the general reader and scientist alike ... pick it up and scan a few pages, you'll probably end up buying it!' Dr Boyd, University College London
' ... very readable ... I will recommend the book to my junior students because it tells some of the story of this fascinating field in simple terms ...' Physics World
'Vidali does very well in describing the basic phenomena, concepts ... well written and interesting for its intended audience ...' Nature
' ... can be recommended to anyone who would like to know more about it.' The Times Higher Education Supplement
' ... plenty of enthusiasm ... the kernel of a good popularization is lurking here.' Contemporary Physics