Everyman's Rules for Scientific Living

Everyman's Rules for Scientific Living

by Carrie Tiffany (Author)

Synopsis

It is 1934, the Great War is long over and the next is yet to come. It is a brief time of optimism and advancement.

Amid billowing clouds of dust and information, the government `Better Farming Train' slides through the wheat fields and small towns of Australia, bringing expert advice to those living on the land. The train is on a crusade to persuade the country that science is the key to successful farming, and that productivity is patriotic.

Among the swaying cars full of cows, pigs and wheat, an unlikely love affair occurs between Robert Pettergree, a man with an unusual taste for soil, and Jean Finnegan, a talented young seamstress with a hunger for knowledge. In an atmosphere of heady scientific idealism, they marry and settle in the impoverished Mallee with the ambition of proving that a scientific approach to cultivation can transform the land.

But after seasons of failing crops, and with the threat of a new World War looming, Robert and Jean are forced to confront each other, the community they have inadvertently destroyed, and the impact of their actions on an ancient and fragile landscape.

Shot through with humour and a quiet wisdom, this haunting first novel vividly captures the hope and the disappointment of the era when it was possible to believe in the perfectibility of both nature and humankind.

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Quantity

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More Information

Format: Hardcover
Pages: 272
Edition: First Edition
Publisher: Picador
Published: 17 Feb 2006

ISBN 10: 0330437763
ISBN 13: 9780330437769

Media Reviews
Tiffany reminds me of John Steinbeck in the depiction of Dust Bowl living and Ernest Hemingway in the lean, controlled prose that evolves such emotional power. A luminous debut. -- Rocky Mountain News
Author Bio
Carrie Tiffany was born in Yorkshire and grew up in Perth, Western Australia. Her debut, Everyman's Rules for Scientific Living, won the Western Australian Premier's Book Award for Fiction and was shortlisted for the 2006 Orange Prize, the Guardian First Book Award, and the Miles Franklin Literary Award.