Murder Most Unladylike: A Murder Most Unladylike Mystery (A Murder Most Unladylike Mystery, 1)

Murder Most Unladylike: A Murder Most Unladylike Mystery (A Murder Most Unladylike Mystery, 1)

Paperback | English
ISBN13: 9780141369761
Condition: NEW Quantity
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20+ item(s) in stock
£7.99
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The first marvellous murder-mystery in the bestselling Murder Most Unladylike series! 'Ripping good fun' The Times 'Plotting is what sets this book apart; this is about who was where at the time of the murder, and it's about finding the chink in the alibi' Telegraph ----- At Deapdean School for Girls, Daisy Wells and Hazel Wong have set up their own detective agency. But they are struggling to find any real crimes to investigate... (Unless you count the case of Lavinia's missing tie. Which they don't.) Then Hazel discovers the Science Mistress, Miss Bell, lying dead in the Gym. To add to the mystery, when she and Daisy return five minutes later, the body has disappeared. Now Hazel and Daisy not only have a murder to solve: they have to prove one happened in the first place. Determined to get to the bottom of the crime before the killer strikes again Hazel and Daisy must hunt for evidence, spy on their suspects and use all the cunning and intuition they can muster. But will they succeed? And can their friendship stand the test? 'A skilful blend of golden era crime novel and boarding school romp . . . The novel works both as an affectionate satire and an effective murder mystery, and Stevens can go places Enid Blyton never dreamt of . . . Top class' Financial Times

Type Book
Number Of Pages 352
Item Height 24 mm
Item Width 130 mm
Item Weight 200 Gram
Product Dimensions 130 x 24 x 196
Publisher Puffin
Format Paperback | 352
Book Overview 'Are you sure we shouldn't just go to the police?' I asked. 'Don't be stupid,' said Daisy severely. 'We don't have any evidence yet. We don't even have a body. They'd simply laugh at us. And anyway, this is our murder case.'

Ripping good fun * The Times *
A skilful blend of golden era crime novel and boarding school romp . . . The novel works both as an affectionate satire and an effective murder mystery, and Stevens can go places Enid Blyton never dreamt of . . . Top class * Financial Times *
Friendship, boarding school and a murder worthy of Agatha Christie * The Bookseller *
Plotting is what sets this book apart; this is about who was where at the time of the murder, and it's about finding the chink in the alibi * Telegraph *
An addictive debut, full of wit, panache and iced-bun breaks * Metro *
Enormous fun * Irish Times *
Part murder mystery, part diary, and a pitch-perfect snapshot of adolescent friendship . . . A sharp-witted debut for Stevens, one that will leave readers eagerly awaiting subsequent instalments * Publishers Weekly *
I envy any young reader discovering this enchanting new series and writer. It's such a clever idea to marry the Malory Towers girls' boarding school novel with the Golden Age of detective fiction, and doing it through the eyes of Hong Kong Chinese heroine Hazel Wong is an especially good touch . . . A real treat -- Amanda Craig
Angela Brazil meets Agatha Christie all mixed up with some Sherlockian tips and winks that made me snuggle down and read with a contented smile. It is a jacket potato on a winter's day book; warm, satisfying, filling . . . This is such a glorious book and it is one which has reinterpreted the school story for the contemporary reader and opened it up with a swift moving and accessible plot line. In Star Trek terms, it is the next generation as compared to the original series. It is very, very gorgeous. Daisy is glorious. Hazel is awesome. I want more, please. It's as simple as that * Did You Ever Stop to Think *
Irresistible . . . It feels both delightfully old-fashioned and current - a difficult balance to pull off, but it's been done with style here. Imagine Agatha Christie visiting Malory Towers and add in some modern sensibilities and you are about there. The plot twists and turns like nobody's business and I didn't guess the real culprit for a very long time, but the real draw is the relationship between the two main characters. Daisy and Hazel are like chalk and cheese but they are perfect foils for one another and together, they make a brilliant detective duo * The Bookbag *
I absolutely loved it - it's charming and witty and there's so much in terms of in-jokes and she really grabs hold of all the traditions of this type of story and runs with them. You've got bunbreak, squashed fly biscuits and dormitories . . . but at the same time as this thrilling murder mystery -- Susie Day

Robin was born in California and grew up in an Oxford college, across the road from the house where Alice in Wonderland lived. She has been making up stories all her life. When she was twelve, her father handed her a copy of The Murder of Roger Ackroyd and she realised that she wanted to be either Hercule Poirot or Agatha Christie when she grew up. She spent her teenage years at Cheltenham Ladies' College, reading a lot of murder mysteries and hoping that she'd get the chance to do some detecting herself (she didn't). She went to university, where she studied crime fiction, and then she worked at a children's publisher. Robin is now a full-time author, and her books, The Murder Most Unladylike Mysteries and The Guggenheim Mystery, are both award-winning and bestselling. She lives in Oxford.