The Portable Machiavelli (Portable Library)

The Portable Machiavelli (Portable Library)

Abridged
ISBN13: 9780140150926
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Edited and translated by Peter Bondanella and Mark Musa, The Portable Machiavelli not only gives the casual reader a chance to read different personal and professional works of Machiavelli, but also strives to do away with many of the myths that have plagued the man's posthumous fame. For example, the famous the ends justifies the means quote is actually a gross exaggeration of what Machiavelli originally wrote, which was in the actions of all men...when there is no impartial arbiter, one must consider the final result. The biggest counterargument Bondanella and Musa can supply is the simple fact that they include a less famous piece Machiavelli did called The Discourses. This piece is often not mentioned or even casually footnoted because it presents the true Machiavelli - a man who was supportive of a Republic government run by the citizens. Any one who believes Machiavelli is a supporter of despots will be surprised to read him speaking in support for fair and public trials and a balance of power between rulers and their people.

Type Book
Number Of Pages 576
Item Height 25 mm
Item Width 127 mm
Item Weight 385 Gram
Product Dimensions 127 x 25 x 196
Publisher Penguin Classics
Format Abridged | 576

Niccolo Machiavelli was born in Florence in 1469 of an old citizen family. In 1498 he was appointed secretary and a second chancellor to the Florentine Republic. During his time of office he accompanied Julius II on his first campaign of conquest. In 1507, as chancellor of the newly appointed Nove di Milizia, he organised an infantry force which fought at the capture of Pisa in 1509. Three years later it was defeated by the Holy League at Prato, the Medici returned to Florence, and Machiavelli was excluded from public life. He retired to his farm near San Casciano, where he gave his time to study and writing. After a brief return to public life, he died in 1527.